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There was a lot of news we found interesting in March 2024, so we've put a few of the news posts on our LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter pages together and a reminder of our blogs.

From our blog:

 

Remote control: coercive control storylines in dramas

 

National conversations about emotional abuse are being fuelled by powerful TV dramas! LGFL's director, Anne Leiper, a "The Archers" aficionado, dissects how these stories expose the manipulative tactics of coercive control.
Head over to the blog to see which shows have sparked discussions and raised awareness!

 

 

Sleep, stress and support: divorce and wellbeing

 

In the second of two articles, I discuss with Registered Nutritionist & Health Coach Kay Kaur seven ways to reduce the physical impact on divorce on your health.

 

 

 

How snoring affects relationships - and divorces

 

Director Rita Gupta was recently asked by the BBC World Service about an issue that comes up time and time again in divorce cases - snoring. As a family lawyer known for her holistic approach to family law, Rita commented in the BBC's article on how snoring affects relationships, and how it "Definitely comes up a lot as a reason for unhappiness in the marriage".

The article was published on the BBC's websites and social feed for World Sleep Day, and translated 18 different languages including Hindi, Urdu, Swahili and Thai! (For the full list of articles in all the different languages, see our blog.)

 

It’s not always over: coercive or controlling behaviour and post-separation abuse

Coercive Control: A Hidden Aspect of Domestic Abuse
Domestic abuse extends far beyond physical violence. Here at LGFL, our family law practice regularly encounters cases involving coercive or controlling behaviour (CCB) within relationships.
Our Managing Director, Rita Gupta, has delved into this critical issue, exploring:
What constitutes CCB?
How to identify and address CCB that persists after separation or divorce.
This information can be invaluable for anyone experiencing or concerned about CCB.

And from our social media streams:

 

Divorce rates at lowest level in decades ‘due to cost-of-living crisis’

Divorces granted in England and Wales reached their lowest level for 50 years, according to the latest statistics. Legal experts have cited the cost-of-living crisis as a possible reason, with couples holding off because of the financial challenges of legal separation.

 

Top fashion designer debuts Baroness Hale inspired court wear

Look based on Lady Hale? Really?

 

Why Missouri currently doesn't allow pregnant women to be legally divorced

It's US law but the points make you think about SEND children for example.

 

Sussex seaside town has second highest divorce rate in the UK

Welcome to Hastings.

 

How has my ex-husband ended up living off me for the rest of his life?

So many high-earning women are being pursued for spousal support by their lower-paid former partner that it has its own name – Man-imony.

 

Spring Budget 2024: Hunt pledges £170m to make justice system ‘fit for the modern era’

“Jeremy Hunt has promised £170m in order to deliver a justice system “fit for the modern era” during his much-vaunted Spring Budget. Hunt stated that “too many legal cases, particularly in family law, should never go to court.” He added that “it would cost us less if they didn’t.””

 

Tips for Mother’s Day for separated parents

When parents separate, Mother’s Day can be difficult for BOTH parents. These are some tips for both parents:

 

Rupert Murdoch, 92, plans to marry for 5th time

Number FIVE for Rupert

 

Seven-Year Itch Confirmed: Gen X Most Likely to Divorce at Average Age 43.9

A recent study has confirmed the long-suspected 'seven-year itch' phenomenon in marriages. The study revealed that the highest number of divorces occur at the seven-year mark.

 

How to deal with debt in a divorce: What are you still on the hook for after a marriage ends

“People in debt can get divorced, but will need to agree a plan or make a formal financial settlement to pay off what they owe. How this responsibility is shared will depend on whether debts run up during marriage are matrimonial - meaning they benefit the couple or a family as a whole - or individual.”

 

How 'grey divorce' reshapes family dynamics: When older couples split, fathers are more likely to lose touch with their children, study finds

“Divorce is always messy – you have to think about finances, living arrangements and of course, the kids. But when it comes to older couples going their separate ways, fathers are more likely to lose touch with their children, a study suggests. There has been a growing trend in recent years for 'grey divorce', when couples in long-term marriages split after the age of 50”

 

Brad Pitt scores victory against ex-wife Angelina Jolie in legal battle over French winery Chateau Miraval involving Russian oligarch Yuri Shefler

It still rages on.

 

Billie Piper finds co-parenting ‘enormously difficult’ with Laurence Fox? So do most exes

The actor’s words mirrored the concerns of many separated parents, says Olivia Petter, who spoke to experts and legal professionals about the best ways to avoid conflict.

 

France trials four-day working week for divorced parents so they can have day off to care for their children.

From September, in some areas, civil servants who look after their children on alternating residence arrangements will have an extra day off if their child is staying with them, said Gabriel Attal, the prime minister, on Sunday.

 

This divorce trend is becoming more popular with celebs

In the last few years, an increasing number of A-listers have taken the “let’s separate and tell them later (even years later)” route.

 

Law students provide court support for divorcing couples

Teesside University law students have been given special permission to attend court to offer support to unrepresented people in family court hearings. The final year law students will provide free emotional support and procedural advice to parties attending first hearing dispute resolution appointments at Middlesbrough family court.

 

Exploring the intersection of family disputes and workplace productivity: Understanding the financial implications of divorce

“All too often, a family dispute between divorcing parties can affect a person’s morale and motivation levels at work. The impact this has on earning potential is evidenced by some interesting statistics on the effect of divorce on a worker’s ability to support themselves and their dependents financially. We take a closer look at the figures, and the factors that could be at play.”

Director Rita Gupta was recently asked by the BBC World Service about an issue that comes up time and time again in divorce cases - snoring.

As a family lawyer known for her holistic approach, Rita was able to add to the BBC's research on how snoring affects relationships:

 

"Rita Gupta, a family lawyer from the UK, said her firm has encountered numerous divorce cases linked to snoring.

"It's definitely come up a lot as a reason for unhappiness in the marriage," she told the BBC.

"I've had lots of people saying, 'Well, we've been sleeping in separate rooms for several years because of his snoring anyway, and we've just drifted apart,'" she added.

The family lawyer said that a common issue in divorce cases is neglecting medical treatments and not taking necessary steps to deal with the issue effectively, indicating underlying commitment issues.

"For example, it is a case against a man, and his wife is saying, 'He's already badly snoring. It's really impacting my sleep. He hasn't taken any steps to address it.'"

 

The article explored how untreated snoring not only impacts the physical and mental health of the snorer but also affects their partner and their ability to get a good night's sleep. It was published on the BBC's websites and social feed for World Sleep Day, and translated 18 different languages including Hindi, Urdu, Swahili and Thai!

Here's the full list of where the article appeared, a truly global reach for our boutique Reading law firm!

 

BBC WEBSITES

BBC Hindi: readin in Hindi

BBC Brasil: read in Portuguese

BBC Mundo: read in Mundo

BBC Arabic: read in Arabic

BBC Turkish: read in Turkish

BBC Punjabi: read in Punjabi

BBC Tamil: read in Tamil

BBC Urdu: read in Urdu

BBC Telugu: read in Telugu

BBC Marathi: read in Marathi

BBC Serbian: read in Serbian

BBC Tigrinya: read in Tigrinya

BBC Swahili: read in Swahili

BBC Hausa: read in Hausa

BBC Ukrainian: read in Ukrainian

BBC Afrique: read in Afrique

BBC Thai: read in Thai

BBC Amharic: read in Amharic

 

BBC SOCIAL MEDIA

Hindi:

Facebook

Instagram

Brasil:

Facebook

Instagram

Mundo:

Facebook

Instagram

Arabic:

Facebook

Instagram

Punjabi:

Facebook

Instagram

Tamil:

Facebook

Instagram

Urdu:

Facebook

Instagram

Telugu:

Facebook

Instagram

Marathi:

Facebook

Serbian:

Facebook

Tigrinya:

Facebook

Ukrainian:

Facebook

Afrique:

Facebook

Thai:

Facebook

Urdu:

Facebook

Swahili:

Facebook

Instagram

Dari Insta:

Facebook

Instagram

In the first article in our innovative series, we looked at how the upheaval of divorce could have a major impact on our diet and in turn, on our emotional state and mental health.

In this second article, LGFL Director Rita Gupta and Kay Kaur.dipNT, mBANT, mCNHC, a Registered Nutritionist & Health Coach discuss the major disruption divorce can cause to our physical wellbeing, and seven practical ways to reduce that impact.

 

1. Regular Exercise

Exercise isn’t just great for your stamina. Science has shown it can be as effective as an anti-depressant alongside a whole food diet. It’s incredibly important for your mental health too, as exercising releases endorphins, helping you manage stress and anxiety.

Rita says: I am very aware that as a busy family lawyer, my clients are relying on me for advice, support and to achieve the best outcomes in divorce for them, their children and their future. I find that lunchtime walks assist me and the team to switch off and reset so I am much better placed to help my clients.

 

2. Quality Sleep

Stressful periods can disrupt your sleep. Establishing a restful environment and a consistent bedtime routine is crucial for your mental health. Sleep hygiene is a great way help induce good quality sleep. Avoid blue light from phones and gadgets in the evening. Essential oils like lavender can help you to fall asleep easier; apply two or three drops to your pillowcase to help you drift off to sleep. You can also dab them on your wrists or on the temples of your head.

A soak in a bath can help you to relax. I personally recommend adding a few handfuls of magnesium bath salts, as magnesium really is nature’s tranquilliser.

Rita says: Sleep deprivation can seriously affect our judgement the next day. Sustained lack of sleep can leave you over-tired, emotional and with low energy levels. It’s important to take time to gently wind down, and not get wound up by any late-night posts. Nothing is so urgent in a non-abusive divorce that it cannot wait until the morning. I am always concerned when clients are reading complex documents relating to their case and providing instructions late or in the middle of the night.

 

3. The Gut-Brain Connection

A healthy gut contributes to better mental health. Incorporating probiotics (good bacteria) and prebiotics can support your gut health, which in turn aids your emotional wellbeing. Fermented foods like Greek yogurt, kimchi, sauerkraut and fermented tofu are great options. Onions, garlic, leeks, asparagus, bananas are great prebiotics which feed the probiotics.

Rita says: Research is increasingly discovering the link between gut health and mental health. For more information, see the work of Dr Tim Spector at ZOE.

 

 

 

4. Stress Reduction Techniques

Practices like meditation, yoga, or deep breathing can be powerful tools for managing stress and anxiety.

Rita says: Sometimes it can feel like there is precious little ‘me’ time during a divorce, especially if you have children. Meditation and yoga gives you back some quality ‘me’ time when you can be in the moment as yourself, not as a client, a parent, or a soon-to-be-ex, but just you.

 

5. Social Support

Never underestimate the power of social support. Reach out to friends, family, or join support groups. Having fun and joy is a necessity.

Rita says: Absolutely! Find people who are pragmatic and positive, empathetic and forward thinking, and trustworthy. Choose people who won’t take what you say and post it on social media or feed it back to your ex-partner…

 

6. Professional Help

Remember, it’s okay to seek professional help. Therapists or counsellors can offer valuable support and coping strategies.

Rita says: At LGFL, we are building a network of professionals who can support our clients through the life-changing process of divorce. In my experience, those who do seek professional help seem to manage stress better than those who dismiss the idea whilst struggling to cope.

 

7. Self-Compassion

Be patient and compassionate with yourself. Healing takes time, and self-compassion is key.

Rita says: Divorce is not about the past, it’s about the future for you, your children, your family and your future. But most importantly, you.

 

Do you need help with divorce?

Contact us to book your initial one-hour fixed fee consultation with us. This gives you plenty of time to discuss your situation and receive valuable legal advice, in complete confidence and with no obligation. The majority of divorcing people who come to LGFL for an initial hour of advice do decide to engage us, for a better divorce experience with less hassle and full professional support.

Call us

Email us

Book your consultation online

 

You can discover more about Kay and her work at:

www.inspirenutrition.uk

Instagram: @inspirenutritionuk

Or call her to make an appointment: 03337 729 406

There was a lot of news we found interesting in February 2024, so we've put a few of the news posts on our LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter pages together and a reminder of our blogs.

From our blog:

Are less people getting divorced? What the stats really reveal

 

The most recent statistics for summer 2023 show divorce rates falling, but what is the bigger picture? Director Rita Gupta looks at the reality behind the stats

 

 

Valentine’s Day and divorce: how to manage unexpected news

 

It's never a good time of year to discover partner wants a divorce, especially if the news comes as a complete surprise. However, the commercial juggernaut of Valentine's Day can make it feel worse. That's why you need to take early legal advice if your spouse wants to divorce, and why it can help you cope with the rollercoaster of emotions.

 

 

Looking after No1: divorce and wellbeing

 

LGFL Director Rita Gupta and Registered Nutritionist Kay Kaur discuss the impact divorce can have on our physical wellbeing, and the importance of looking after ourselves.

 

 

And from our social media streams:

 

Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie's divorce development

Seven years after Angela filed for divorce from Brad - with whom she shares six children - the pair appear to be close to dissolving their marriage after they both finally submitted their financial documents.

 

How a Prenup Could Make Marriage Less Stressful the Second Time Around

Prenuptial discussions often increase understanding between the couple about goals, aspirations, and security.

 

Divorced women see their household income drop twice as much as divorced men

These are concerning figures: "Divorced women see their household income drop twice as much as divorced men"

 

Pensions and divorce: Why financial advice is a 'game changer'

Talking to a financial adviser helps achieve fair outcomes

 

House of Lords considers ban on unregulated psychologists’ assessments of domestic abuse victims

The House of Lords has been considering amendments to the Victims and Prisoners Bill, many of which would, if approved, affect family proceedings once the legislation is introduced.

 

How to get your finances back on track following divorce

There can be a lot to navigate financially when a couple parts ways.

 

The Divorce Gap – women see their household income drop twice as much as men, following divorce

Women see their household income fall by 41%, compared to men (21%) in the year following a divorce.

 

High Court: Parties can continue to live together after decree of divorce

Irish court understand the family predicament: granting a divorce though the couple will remain living in the same house.

“a solution that will minimise stress and upheaval in a family where the mother has a serious illness”.

 

Sanctioned Russian oligarch wins appeal in multibillion-dollar London divorce battle

London as 'divorce capital of the world' may be in for a change.

 

7 Emotions: How It May Feel to Decide to Divorce

"The decision to divorce is a personal and deeply emotional experience. There is a common misperception that the person who decides to divorce doesn’t suffer from the decision."

 

17 Divorced People Who Remarried Their Ex Revealed What Actually Happened After

Married, divorced and married again - couples tell how it went.

 

Can you have a friendly divorce?

"Using one lawyer for both of us helped remove the mud slinging"

 

Divorce is a time of rapid change and considerable upheaval, which can take a toll on our emotional state and mental health. However, it can also take a considerable toll on our physical health, with meals skipped or not eating properly due to lack of time and stress.

In this innovative joint article, the first of two, LGFL Director Rita Gupta and Kay Kaur dipNT, mBANT, mCNHC, a Registered Nutritionist & Health Coach join forces to discuss the impact divorce can have on our physical wellbeing. Drawing on their own expertise and real-world experiences, they discuss why it’s important not to underestimate the impact on your emotional health.

Kay Kaur:

As a nutritionist, I see the impact suddenly having a poor diet has on people’s ability to function at their normal mental and physical capacity. If your diet changes, it will affect your brain function, energy levels, and ultimately, your ability to manage and emerge from your divorce in a better frame of mind.

For many of us, our diet is a response to emotional state. If we are feeling upset or sad, we may well turn to “comfort eating” of food with high sugar and/or carbohydrate content. Stress can also make us feel that we don’t want to eat, and when we do, we tend to snack rather than prepare and eat a balanced diet.

Here are my top tips for spotting if your “divorce eating habits” are affecting your mood, your capacity to deal with emotions and your general mental and physical health.

1: Blood Sugar Balancing

Maintaining stable blood sugar levels is important. Erratic blood sugar can exacerbate mood swings and stress. To keep your blood sugars relatively even, aim for a diet balanced with 20-30g of proteins, plenty of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats, and complex carbs. Include healthy fats and protein for your snack options too.

Rita says: Time spent dealing with your separation, discussing your case with your legal team and any potential court hearings can affect your ability and desire to eat at your normal times.

Court hearings can be a long and tiring day for all of us. You may not feel like eating due to nerves or apprehension, but it's important not to skip breakfast. Equally, come to court prepared with water and snacks to sustain you through the day. One way to keep your blood sugar level (and a level head too!) is to pair dried fruit with some nuts as a snack, to slow down the glucose spike into your bloodstream. Just in case, at LGFL we usually bring snacks as part of our support to clients at court.

 

2. Emotional Balance

Your diet plays a crucial role in how you feel. Foods rich in nutrients like leafy greens, nuts, and seeds will boost your serotonin levels. Serotonin is the so-called happy hormone, helping to stabilise mood swings common during divorce.

Rita says: As a family lawyer, I see first-hand evidence of how mood swings can affect my clients throughout the day and night. I always encourage clients to NOT send emails in the middle of the night. This is when mood swings can adversely affect what they type or post on social media and even the quality of the instructions they give. I shall now also suggest they have a nut and seed mix next to their laptop or phone, just in case…

 

3. Hydration

Keeping yourself hydrated is essential. Dehydration can negatively impact your mood and cognitive function, which are already under strain during stressful times. Limit your tea and coffee intake: they contain caffeine and tannin which acts as a diuretic.

Also, invest in a nice colourful glass bottle or an Air-Up type bottle which gently flavours your water with no additives. Either will make it easier to keep on top of your optimum 2 litres a day.

Rita says: On a day when I’m meeting lots of clients in person, I could quickly end up drinking too much coffee or tea, which in turn could affect my ability to give balanced legal advice. So I always have a bottle of water on my desk, to sip during the meeting, helping keep my mind alert. We ensure clients have plenty of water available in any meetings.

 

4. Mindful Eating

Be mindful of your eating habits. Stress can lead to overeating or loss of appetite. Try to listen to your body's hunger cues and practice mindful eating so you do not compromise your health in turn.

Rita says: As a practitioner I can often see dramatic changes in my client’s weight due to erratic eating. Taking time away from the stress of a separation is essential and eating properly is vital for balance.

 

Considering getting divorced?

Talk to LGFL first for an empathetic approach and professional pragmatic legal advice. We offer a 1-hour reduced fee consultation to discuss your specific circumstances and concerns. We aim to give you tailored legal advice and information, so you can proceed in the best way for you, your children and your future.

- Call us

- Email us

- Book your appointment online

 

You can discover more about Kay and her work at:

www.inspirenutrition.uk

Instagram: @inspirenutritionuk

Or call her to make an appointment: 03337 729 406

Valentine’s Day can bring much joy, but not necessarily if you’re recently divorced or separated. LGFL Director Rita Gupta explores how to proceed if you were not expecting to be single, and the divorce announcement has been an unwelcome gift.

One of my team recently showed me an email she had received from one of the country’s leading letter box flower delivery company.

“A sensitive occasion is coming up. Want to snooze it?

In a few weeks’ time, we’re going to start sending emails about Valentine’s Day.

Rather not hear about it? Totally fine.

You can snooze Valentine’s Day emails here. We won’t send you anything related to this date. You’ll still get all our other emails though, like normal.”

I was impressed by the flower firm’s empathetic approach and the understanding of the feelings of those who are on their own or soon to be - and are not happy about it.

 

Unexpected news

To a proportion of our clients, the news that their spouse wants a divorce comes as a bolt out the blue. They might have realised that the situation isn’t ideal but did not realise that their partner considered the marriage beyond repair. The revelation, and sometimes the unexpected arrival of divorce papers, leaves them feeling confused, hurt and at a loss as to their next course of action.

 

An emotional rollercoaster

When a spouse first states “I want a divorce”, the other partner’s response will very much depend on where they stand emotionally. One partner may have fallen out of love, but the other may still had deep feelings and very much want to stay married.

As outlined in our popular article “A rollercoaster of feelings: how a divorce progresses emotionally”:

“A single event might trigger that announcement, whether a minor argument that’s the final straw, or an unwelcome revelation such as an affair. At that point, you or your partner may have already checked out emotionally. So the two of you will not be coming at the case from the same emotional angle. This dictates the entire direction of the case and how you and your partner reach agreement on your children and finances.”

 

What to do next

If you are facing this situation of an unexpected divorce announcement, your first course of action should be to take legal advice straight away. Talking through your situation with an experienced and empathetic family lawyer can help you understand your options. Timely advice can also prevent you taking hasty decisions that might become problematic later, especially in terms of the family home, finances, and child arrangements.

 

Better working together

If you have children together, they should be at the centre of your divorce planning. Remember that you will always be a parent even when you are not a spouse anymore. A divorce process that involves expert legal advice, mediation and a collaborative approach can help parents separate with their focus on the children and their future, rather than solely on themselves. This can often lead to more measured approaches and proportionate litigation that are rooted in reality and fairness rather than inflated expectations.

 

Separating out finances

There is no such thing as a “quickie divorce”. Even under the new streamlined system and with a mutually agreed joint application, the timescale will usually be around six months from application to completion. During that time, the world does not stand still. Food still needs to be bought, mortgages and bills still need to be paid, and children need to continue to live their normal life as far as possible. Taking early legal advice on how to approach untangling your finances and home lives is therefore essential.

 

Through Valentine’s and beyond

Even the most straightforward of uncontested divorces will have an impact on those around you, including family and relatives, friends, and social networks. Talk to them and gain any emotional and practical support they can offer.

This may seem a major struggle at first, but as I explained in my article “More than one rollercoaster: how the emotions of divorce influence your friends, work and future”:

“On your emotional rollercoaster, you may just see steep hills to climb, such as finances, child arrangements, and perhaps the prospect of living on your own for the first time in decades. In reality, there are sections that are a much easier ride, and take your forward to a different life post-separation.”

 

Protect your mental health

Professional help from a mental health specialist can be invaluable during a divorce. At LGFL we partner with experienced therapists and holistic practitioners who can help our clients manage the mental challenges of divorce. These can include stress, anxiety, lack of confidence and the myriad of emotions raised at this major upheaval in their lives. Watch out for our further health and well being articles, as part of our “Divorce is more than just the law” series.

 

Your first step towards your post-divorce future

Contact us to book your initial reduced fee one hour consultation. We can talk in complete confidence at our discreet countryside offices just outside Reading, or online if you prefer. There’s no obligation and you can extend the time available if you wish. You’ll always meet with one of our two Directors to discuss your unique situation, who will oversee all aspects of your divorce from start to finish should you decide to instruct us.

To make that first step:

- Call us

- Email us

- Request your appointment online

Every quarter, the Family Court issues stats on how many divorces take place courts in England and Wales. Managing Director Rita Gupta looks at the figures released for July to September 2023, and compares these to her own experiences here at LGFL.

 

27,290 divorce applications, down 12%

Many of the newspapers latched onto the fact that divorce applications in July-September 2023 were down 12% on the same period last year. However, last year we were still taking applications from couples who had waited until the “no fault’ legislation came into force. So 2022 applications were inevitably up.

At LGFL, we’ve found that over the 2023 summer period, we had less enquiries about divorces. This is nothing unusual, in that parents with children may delay filing for divorce until after the school summers holidays. Also, the cost of living crisis meant that people were looking for cheaper ways to divorce.

However, we’re now seeing the effects of those choices.

  • We have advised couples who realised in September that they were only delaying the inevitable, and we had a busy autumn as a result.
  • Sadly, too, we had to deal with the fallout of people filing for divorce online and not completing the forms correctly.

Many also discovered to their cost that whilst you can file for divorce online yourself, that’s only the start of the process. Sorting out the crucial life-important components of a divorce, including a financial settlement and child arrangements, can be complex and involved. The online filing process offers no advice or support in the creation of settlements and arrangements that are tailored to your needs and circumstances.

By taking legal advice early, you can understand what is required to obtain the best outcome for you and your family. Appointing a family lawyer will ensure you benefit from their experience and expert knowledge, and enables you to move forward with confidence. LGFL will deal with the legal paperwork and day to day progress of your divorce application, leaving you to concentrate on your family.

 

1% decrease in domestic violence remedy order applications

A 1% decrease is barely significant in our experience, as these stats only account for domestic violence. We increasingly deal with cases under the wider definition of domestic abuse, and especially cases involving coercive control. The good news is that the awareness of this aspect of domestic abuse is growing, gradually eroding the significant role it often plays in preventing victims coming forward.

However, the summer figures for domestic violence will inevitably increase in the quarter from October to December, due to financial stress and emotional tensions over the Christmas period.

 

Divorce timescales down

The timescales or divorce proceedings decreased from the same period in 2022, as the no fault system is now bedded in, and the courts are finally clearing most of their backlog.

  • The mean average time between application to conditional order was 41 weeks, down 2 weeks.
  • The mean average time from application to final order was 65 weeks, down 1 week.
  • For all-digital cases through the Courts and Tribunals Service Centre, the average time to conditional order was 32 weeks.

However, it’s important to remember that there is no such thing as a quickie divorce. There is a mandatory waiting period between applying for divorce and applying for the conditional order (CO) of at least 20 weeks. So the divorce timescales CANNOT reduce any lower than this.

 

Thinking of getting divorced in 2024?

Contact us first. There is no substitute for professional, timely and accurate legal advice from an experienced divorce lawyer. Our expertise can help ensure you achieve the best outcome for you and your family with the minimum of stress. Our clients often say how their initial outlay on advice and legal services was repaid many times over by the advice, support and outcomes achieved by the LGFL team.

- Call us

- Email us

- Book your 1 hours reduced fee consultation with one of our Directors

There was a lot of news we found interesting in December & January, so we've put a few of the news posts on our Facebook and Twitter pages together and a reminder of our blogs.

From our blog:

“What happens next”: Rita Gupta interviewed about domestic abuse on London Live TV

 

Tying in with the UN campaign "16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence", LGFL Managing Director Rita Gupta discusses legal ways forward to help those suffering abuse on London Live TV.

 

 

Domestic abuse and Christmas: help is always there

 

If you or anyone you know are experiencing domestic violence whether self-isolating or working from home, download our new leaflet detailing organisations who can help.

 

 

 

Post-Christmas relationship breakdowns and the myth of Divorce Day

 

National Divorce Day is a myth, but the effect of Christmas holiday tensions on already fracturing relationships is very real. Our holistic, tailored approach ensures our approach is as unique as our client's circumstances.

 

 

“Love and respect”: celebrity divorces of 2023

 

Our celebrity divorces roundup for 2023 including Hollywood A list actors, Prime Ministers and two princesses of pop.

 

 

And from our social media streams:

"It doesn’t have to be all doom and gloom:” Divorce coach reveals the secrets to a good breakup

Divorce rates spike in January, as couples across the UK agree to call it quits after Christmas

 

Pensions and divorce - how to split your retirement savings

A divorce can be a costly affair - and while you may be thinking about who gets the house and how to share time with the kids, pensions is also an important discussion point - but one that often gets overlooked.

 

Divorce Day: Cost-of-living crisis shift couples' separations into Spring

Divorce day moves this year perhaps?

 

Do You Have to Divorce Extended Family, Too?

Suggestions on how to navigate maintaining familial ties when you split.

 

No fault divorce applications done 12% on year ago

Interesting stats!

 

Nationwide will offer safe spaces for people experiencing domestic abuse

People will be able to use a private room and can access a phone to discreetly call for support, Nationwide Building Society said.

 

Rich parents insist on prenups

Pre-nups or Bank of Mum and Dad with strings attached? Article in the Times.

 

Emily Ratajkowski wants to pen a book on divorce

"I can't believe there aren't more books about first marriages failing. A lot of literature about divorce tends to be about families ending after children have grown up. I think so many are divorcing at younger ages, a it's such a taboo with such stigma”.

 

British woman still married to ‘prominent’ Indonesian businessman – judge rules

Round one to the estranged wife of wealthy Indonesian businessman in divorce fight.

 

Filing for divorce? Here’s why you need a good solicitor

Not just our word for it. London Loves Business suggests it too.

 

Wife sues ex-husband for age discrimination after he left her for a younger woman

Age discrimination on divorce?

“Discrimination claims were dismissed after the tribunal ruled that it was actually her who left the marriage and that Mr Belson’s new girlfriend is in fact older than her.”

 

99-year-old man divorced wife of 70 years after finding secret love letters from affair she had 60 years ago

Divorcing after 70 years of marriage- yes 70!

 

Magistrate given formal warning after researching defendant online

More training for magistrates required?

 

The day we told our children we were getting a divorce

"There was no huge moment. No Big Bang. It was 3pm on an average Tuesday afternoon when my husband Matt and I decided to go our separate ways".

 

Judges encouraged to embrace AI — carefully

For summarising or administrative tasks, the guidance states that judges may find AI tools useful. Sir Geoffrey Vos, Master of the Rolls and the country’s second most senior judge, added that AI provides “great opportunities for the justice system”, and the potential to help develop “a better, quicker and more cost-effective digital justice”.

 

‘TikTok changed my husband - so I’m divorcing him’

The trend of “tradwife” - or "traditional wife" - videos on Tik-Tok.

 

How to deal with missing your children when you’re away from them

Something many divorced parents find hard to deal with.

 

Coping with divorce and borderline personality disorder

One of the most daunting challenges for couples—whether married or going through a divorce—is navigating the complexities of mental health disorders. The stress of marriage and child-rearing, even for the emotionally stable, becomes astronomically harder when coupled with mental health issues.

If you missed what we’ve been sharing last month, here’s a round up of our blogs and some of the news posts on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

From our blog:

Reaching out: LGFL in the media

LGFL in the media Feb 2021

 

How LGFL are reaching new audiences through digital media channels, including digital magazine, blogs and a brand new radio station.

 

Financial Remedies Court now “an established and permanent part of the Family Court”

family court finance

 

As the Financial Remedies Courts become part of the system, we look at what they are, why they are important, and how taking proper legal advice early is still crucial for financial settlements for divorce or separation.

 

 

 

Why being a “keyboard warrior” could affect your family law case

keyboard typring for keyboard warrior

 

Communicating with your ex-partner during your separation can be stressful, but as our latest article shows, hitting Reply can help save emotional email exchanges ending up before a judge in court.

 

 

 

 

From our social media:

Still staying home

Work from home guidance to remain in place until 21 June at the earliest.

 

Entire school board resigns after accidental public livestream

Another reminder about being careful with remote communications.

 

No pay rises for judges this year

"Buckland told the review body that he will not be issuing a remit letter for an annual review of judicial pay for the 2021/22 year as the government will not be able to implement the recommendations."

 

Have you seen this new app from amicable?

It's to help you manage all aspects of co-parenting in one secure place, making parenting after divorce and separation simpler.

 

Railways and Women’s Aid help hundreds of abuse victims escape

Some help from the railways for victims of abuse. Since April last year 747 adults and 273 children — have used the Rail to Refuge scheme.

 

 

 

Calls for widespread coronavirus testing as more Nightingale courts announced

“If action is not taken to increase capacity further, case delays will continue to increase and more victims, witnesses, and defendants will be denied access to justice.” Law Society President David Greene talks to the Daily Mail about the courts backlog

 

BBC announces The Split season 3 will be the final series

For those addicted to this series - it's coming to an end!

 

Why Adele won’t sing about her divorce

Adele won't sing to tell all.

 

Top judge rocks incredible judicial face mask

Now that's a face mask to match your outifit!

 

The prevalence of domestic violence is staggering. It’s time to bring it out of the shadows

"The issue remains deeply misunderstood, shrouded in shame and judgment of the victims, enabled by excuse-making for the perpetrators"

 

A survival guide to pensions on divorce

A great resource for divorcing couples.

 

Divorced woman runs giveaway competition about her wedding rings

One way to deal with your wedding rings after a divorce.